Restoration Projects

The roof and dome restoration is complete! Copyright-Turnkey Digital

The roof and dome restoration is complete! Copyright-TurnKey Digital

Cupola & Dome Restoration 

Cuploa & Dome before restoration

Cupola & Dome before restoration

 

The elaborate scaffolding system being installed

The elaborate scaffolding system being installed

Interior of cupola with the roofing material removed on the outside. The original metal roofing was rusted at several locations and became detached from the roof. Without quick action by the City the roofing could have blown off the dome.

Interior of cupola with the roofing material removed on the outside. The original metal roofing was rusted at several locations and became detached from the roof. Without quick action by the City the roofing could have blown off the dome.

There were several areas of the dome that had become rotted or were damaged from decades of birds, rain and snow. This picture shows snow in the dome. The City's first objective was to keep the rain and snow (and birds!) out of the interior of the building to prevent further decay of the structural integrity of the framing.

There were several areas of the dome that had become rotted or were damaged from decades of birds, rain and snow penetrating the interior. This picture shows snow in the dome. The City’s first objective was to keep the rain and snow (and birds!) out of the interior of the building to prevent further decay of the structural integrity of the framing.There was so much water penetrating the building when it rained that the City had to place buckets in the attic to catch the rain water and keep it from entering the spaces below the attic. The dome and roof couldn't get restored fast enough! There was so much water penetrating the building when it rained that the City had to place buckets in the attic to catch the rain water and keep it from entering the spaces below the attic. The dome and roof couldn’t get restored fast enough!

One of eight louvers on the cupola. This one shows the amount of fecal matter left behind by the pigeons that occupied the space for decades. The metal screening that was installed by previous owners had failed and the birds took advantage of the failing system. The snow and rain also found its way into the cupola. At one point the City had to shovel out the interior of the cupola!

One of eight louvers on the cupola. This one shows the amount of fecal matter left behind by the pigeons that occupied the space for decades. The metal screening that was installed by previous owners had failed and the birds took advantage of the failing system. The snow and rain also found its way into the cupola. At one point the City had to shovel out the interior of the cupola!

There are 16 ribs around the dome that add a nice shadow line. When the original roofing was removed there were several ribs that had become severely rotted and detached from the substrate. These had to be strengthened with new material installed in order to hold the new copper roof and last at least another 100 years!

There are 16 ribs around the dome that add a nice shadow line. When the original roofing was removed there were several ribs that had become severely rotted and detached from the substrate. These had to be strengthened with new material installed in order to hold the new copper roof and last at least another 100 years!

Exterior trim around the dome that has seen better days.

Exterior trim around the dome that has seen better days.

This image shows the lightning protection system being installed. There was no lightning protection on the cupola previously! With a new copper roof it was important to provide this safety feature to protect the City's investment in this historical structure.

This image shows the lightning protection system being installed. There was no lightning protection on the cupola previously! With a new copper roof it was important to provide this safety feature to protect the City’s investment in this historical structure.

 

This is the turret on top of the dome before her new copper roof.

This is the turret on top of the dome before her new copper roof.

 

Restored column re-installed after being primed and ready for paint! The columns were removed and restored in a shop off-site.

Restored column re-installed after being primed and ready for paint! The columns were removed and restored in a shop off-site.

 

One of 8 louvers that benefited from complete restoration

One of 8 louvers that benefited from complete restoration

 

In order to preserve as much of the historical materials as possible there was a lot of scraping of old paint that took place. A LOT!

In order to preserve as much of the historical materials as possible there was a lot of scraping of old paint that took place. A LOT!

Copper installation begins!

Copper installation begins!

New copper with soldered seams will last a long time compared to the aluminum roof with caulked seams that was part of the bid alternates. The difference between copper and aluminum was just over $50,000. Well worth the increase in price due to longevity and less maintenance.

New copper with soldered seams will last a long time compared to the aluminum roof with caulked seams that was part of the bid alternates. The difference between copper and aluminum was just over $50,000. Well worth the increase in price due to longevity and less maintenance.

Restoration on the cupola is almost complete!

Restoration of the cupola is almost complete!

The new crenelation (crown) on the dome replicates the same feature that originally was on the dome.

The new crenelation (crown) on the dome replicates the same feature that originally was on the dome. (1881)

 

Roof restoration begins!

Pictured is one of 4 main valley's on the courthouse roof. Each valley rafter that supports a large portion of the roof were risked collapsing due to water penetrating the leaking roof and causing portions of the rafter's to rot away.

Pictured is one of 4 main valley’s on the courthouse roof. Each valley rafter that supports a large portion of the roof were collapsing due to water penetrating the roof and causing portions of the rafter’s to rot away.

The City discovered tarps in the attic that would  catch rain water that came in through the attic and dome. Unfortunately the rain water rotted out a valley rafter that was one of four main supports for the cupola. The architect required immediate repair to the valley rafter, and stated the cupola was at risk of collapsing within a few years! City inspector's built walls underneath the valley rafter until the area could be completely restored. City staff were utilized to help keep costs down.

The City discovered tarps in the attic that would catch rain water that came in through the attic and dome. Unfortunately the rain water rotted out a valley rafter that was one of four main supports for the cupola. The architect required immediate repair to the valley rafter, and stated the cupola was at risk of collapsing within a few years! City inspector’s built walls underneath the valley rafter until the area could be completely restored. City staff were utilized to help keep costs down.

What's left of the framing that supported the gutter system along the edge of the roof.

What’s left of the framing that supported the gutter system along the edge of the roof. Many years of rain…many years of leaking.

The crown moulding that was installed along the entire roof line of the building was starting to fall off the building due to the backing it was nailed too becoming rotten over years of neglect.

The crown moulding that was installed along the entire roof line of the building was starting to fall off the building due to the backing it was nailed too becoming rotten over years of neglect.

Years of water leaking through the roof at several locations caused the wood framing and roof decking to become severely deteriorated and structurally unsafe. Luckily the City of Woodstock was able to bring the roof and underlying framing members into a safe and sound condition.

Years of water leaking through the roof at several locations caused the wood framing and roof decking to become severely deteriorated and structurally unsafe. Luckily the City of Woodstock was able to bring the roof and underlying framing members into a safe and sound condition.

The original standing seam metal roof had been covered with a rubber type of material. The seams of the original roof were hammered flat to make the rubber roofing easier to install. Not exactly the proper way to install roofing and that's why it failed prematurely and caused decades of water to enter the interior of the building. The City tore off all the layers of roofing, added insulation, weather barrier, and then installed new copper roofing. When things are done the right way they will last a very long time!

The original standing seam metal roof had been covered with layers of asphalt roofing type of material. The seams of the original roof were hammered flat to make the asphalt roofing easier to install. Rather than properly replacing the roof decades ago, a series of patches were applied in an attempt to try and stop localized leaking. The City tore off all the layers of roofing, added insulation, weather barrier, and then installed new copper roofing. When things are done the right way they will last a very long time!

Renaissance Restoration has begun installing the copper roofing panels.

Renaissance Restoration has begun installing the copper roofing panels.

 

Front Stairs Restoration

006 limestone steps   1960s

Limestone steps circa 1960s

Several layers of patching material were applied to the limestone steps over the years in an attempt to stop the limestone from deteriorating further. Unfortunately, limestone material needs to breathe and adding the patching material only allowed water to penetrate the stone even more. In colder weather the water would freeze and cause the limestone to fracture creating an unsafe surface to walk on.

Several layers of patching material were applied to the limestone steps over the years in an attempt to stop the limestone from deteriorating further. Unfortunately, limestone material needs to breathe and adding the patching material only allowed water to penetrate the stone even more. In colder weather the water would freeze and cause the limestone to fracture creating an unsafe surface to walk on.

Trip hazard creating a dangerous staircase.

Trip hazard creating a dangerous staircase.

The top landing of the limestone staircase had a large hole in it that was patched over with a piece of thin aluminum and a half inch of mortar. If someone were to jump in this spot they could have fallen through!

The top landing of the limestone staircase had a large hole in it that was patched over with a piece of thin aluminum and a half inch of mortar. This is a picture taken from underneath the landing. If someone were to jump in this spot they could have fallen through!

Demolition begins!

Demolition begins! The anticipated completion of the stair restoration is end of November 2014.

 

EXTERIOR BRICK REPAIR/TUCKPOINTING

The south side of the Sheriff's House and the Courthouse needed immediate repairs to stop the spalling of brick faces, cracking, and bricks actually falling off the building.

The south side of the Sheriff’s House and the Courthouse needed immediate repairs to stop the spalling of brick faces, cracking, and bricks falling off the building.

The south side of the Sheriff's House and the Courthouse needed immediate repairs to stop the spalling of brick faces, cracking, and bricks falling off the building.

The worst sections were tuckpointed and bricks were replaced where they had been dislodged from the wall.

The worst sections were tuck-pointed and bricks were replaced where they had been dislodged from the wall.

The contractor stained the bricks to match the rest of the building that was stained many years ago.

The contractor stained the bricks to match the rest of the building that had been stained many years ago.

 

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